"Beautiful pole people, please point your toes"

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WINNER OF WORLD POLE DANCE SPORT & FITNESS 2012                   NATALIA TATARINTSEVA (UKRAINE)

WINNER OF WORLD POLE DANCE SPORT & FITNESS 2012                   NATALIA TATARINTSEVA (UKRAINE)

missdrusilla:

Many pole dancers fear being a “boring” dancer. Either you don’t have enough tricks, you have too many, you feel like you’re not a strong on the floor, you draw a blank in free dance, etc. Those are all legitimate concerns — my worst fear is performing and feeling like no one gets it. 

First of all, SLOW DOWN. Go half the speed you’re going and do half of the things you want to do. Usually, I go from Point A to Point B, I don’t take time to savor the moments in between. Dancing at one speed and moving just to make movements means that you’re doing everything but giving meaning to none. 

What I love about trained dancers is that the dynamism of their movement causes a delay of satisfaction. For example, a slow movement that suddenly becomes super fast and tight is something that tells viewers “you should really pay attention” and the change in pace becomes “here’s why!”. That delay creates interest and ultimately, originality. A few of the gifs in the header are fantastic examples of this.

Today I want to introduce you to my saving grace — “SIN”ning. It’s an acronym I made up for myself when I was collaborating on choreography for my CA Pole Dance Championships piece. It means: 

  • Specificity — Great movement is specific. For example, it’s not just my arm moving across my body, it’s the flick of my hand that can make it sensual or sassy. 
  • Intent — Why am I moving? Movement needs to be a demonstration of purpose. Is there a point to extending my legs like that or do I do it just because everyone who has taught me/I’ve seen do it does it that way?
  • Nuance — Quiet moments are just as important as big and loud ones, most people forget them. You need contrast in your dance.